TMS – Effective New Treatment for Depression

“Seven months ago I was so depressed I wasn’t able to function. After six weeks of Nashville TMS Therapy, I was back to work feeling great! I was enjoying my kids again and I got my life back.” – Craig, 38 years young

TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) is a new therapy that involves no drugs and is proven safe and effective – for treatment-resistant depression! TMS is free of the negative side effects often associated with taking antidepressants.

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Stressed Out Parents and Teachers

Learn How to Combat the Pressure


Stressed Teacher or DadAllen cares about the dark-haired, heavy-set girl who is smacking her gum and texting with both thumbs. Her name is Cherish. He cares about her classmate Shakeen, standing on his seat, throwing someone’s backpack over a dozen heads to the outstretched arms across the room. A half dozen others call out to be the next receiver.

Allen tells himself - again - that this is typical teenage stuff, just blowing off steam. It’s not a mockery of his authority or teaching ability. He cares about these kids, and they know it. So he allows them to play it out for a few moments before calling class to order. But not before his own tension rises like a thermometer on a blistering August day in New Orleans.

 

Demands of Child Care are Intense


Teaching and caring for children is an intense and demanding job. Parents and teachers are under pressure to meet the demands of running a household/classroom, personal concerns, and responding to the child/children in their care.

Stress is natural and can be inevitable, but stress can take a toll on your health and effectiveness as a parent or provider.  Our teacher, Allen, deals with stress every day, multiple times each day. For him, it’s an unavoidable part of the job. If Allen allows his stress to build, it could impact his blood pressure and ultimately his health.

And stress doesn’t just affect you, it also impacts the children in your care.

 

Research shows that:


•        Caregivers who are stressed find it more difficult to offer praise, nurturance and the structure that young children need.

•        Caregivers who are stressed are more likely to use harsh discipline.

•        Children whose caregivers are under high stress tend to have more challenging behavior

 

Why is Stress so dangerous?


Stress is a physical, mental or emotional response to events and causes bodily or mental tension. It comes from a situation or a thought that makes you feel frustrated, nervous, anxious or angry. Stress can be a good thing, but it can also be quite harmful. Allen’s stress is not necessarily a good type of stress. He feels uptight, and it’s not a motivator, as it could be in an athletic competition, for instance.

Harmful stress is the kind we need to limit and learn to manage in a healthy way.

Common Sources of Provider Stress

Common Symptoms of Stress

Answer these questions:


—  What are my sources of stress?

—  How do I know when I am experiencing stress?

—  What are my stress reactions?

Your thoughts impact your behavior. Stress comes from our perception of the situation. Technically, the actual situation is not stressful, our perceptions MAKE IT stressful. Sometimes we are right, sometimes we are wrong!

There are common unhelpful patterns of thinking, so it’s important to recognize that thoughts impact your behavior and emotions. ‘Talk back’ to your unhelpful thoughts and focus on what is in your control versus out of your control. Keep a flexible and revolving door approach to the types of activities or strategies you choose to reduce stress.

 Unhelpful Patterns of Thinking


Coping with Stress


What is a coping strategy?


It’s the process of managing stressful situations in a deliberate and planned approach. The goal is to reduce, tolerate, or minimize stress. It must be individualized, as you and your reactions are unique. So you must find what works best for you!

Create a coping strategy toolbox - a real or imaginary “box” collecting coping strategies that are successful for you. First, make sure you’ve handled the basics:

•        Eat a well- balanced diet; drink fluids low in sugar, calories, and caffeine; have healthy snacks; and drink water!

•        Sleep well

•        Exercise: any activity that you find enjoyable

•        Create time each day to decompress

•        Talk with friends, peers, avoid gossip and hurtful conversations

•        Write in a journal

•        Pair enjoyable activities or tasks with less enjoyable activities or tasks

•        Reward yourself for a job well done

 

Your Coping Strategy Toolbox


Use a Stress Log


Really pay attention to your stress by using a stress log. It will help you identify and understand your stress experiences. It also builds awareness of how you react to stress. Review your stress log periodically to reveal common themes or circumstances associated with your experience of and reaction to stress.

From all this new information, you can consciously identify next steps in learning how to manage stress based on your strengths and challenges.

How to keep a stress log

 How to Keep a Stress Log


There are a number of steps for keeping and making use of a stress log

  • —Record your stressors within a time period and rate your stress response

  • —Review the types of stressors you experienced, your response, their frequency, and any common themes

  • —Note Next Steps including your strengths, challenges, and plans to improve how you will manage stress in next steps and your Individualized Action Plan


 Stress Busting Techniques


Stress Buster Activity


Think about a time when you were stressed and you found a way to manage your reaction and feelings.

Finish this sentence: “One of the best things I can do for myself when I am feeling stressed is…..”

Now review the following techniques and choose a few new tools that you can add to your everyday toolbox.

 

Controlled or Deep Breathing


This technique involves focusing on taking slow, deep, even breaths. It’s simple, but effective and can be done any time, anywhere. Controlled breathing helps us to calm down. To keep thoughts calm and relaxed while breathing, introduce the words “calm” or “relax” while breathing out. Imagine your other thoughts floating away in a balloon

 

Progressive Muscle Relaxation


This technique, also called Jacobson relaxation or progressive muscle relaxation, involves tightening and relaxing various muscle groups. Progressive relaxation is often combined with guided imagery and breathing exercises. It’s useful for relaxing the muscles when they feel tight because of emotional stress.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation provides the most optimal relaxation. You can do it standing or sitting, in case you are at work or in a limited movement situation.

The key: tense a group of muscles, hold in a state of extreme tension for a few seconds, relax the muscles.

That’s it. Easy!

 

Autogenic Training


In autogenic training, you learn to concentrate on the physical sensations of warmth, heaviness, and relaxation in different parts of your body. You actually create this in the physical world when you focus on it mentally and emotionally. You manifest what you think about. So think about what you want in your body, too.

Thought Stopping



Thought Stopping


Helps break the cognitive distortion cycle and gets you back on track. The key: Notice your thoughts, use a trigger word to stop the thought. Then replace it with a more helpful thought.

 

Example: 

There is no point in trying…

STOP!

This situation could be easier if I first talked with ….”

Be your own biggest support person!

 

Positive Self-Statements


Introduce repetitive positive and motivating statements into your day and in reaction to your thoughts.

Examples of positive statements:

I am smart! I work hard! I always do my best.”

Examples of positive thought replacements:

•        Instead of:  “I need to be perfect or I fail.

•        Replace with: “I did a great job learning this new curriculum!

Whew! What a relief to hear a kind and supportive voice. The stress just melts away.

 

Active Listening


By listening actively, you build relationships and send a message of respect for the thoughts and experiences of others. You involve listening to the content of the conversation as well as feelings and non-verbal cues within the message. Example of the difference:

•        Speaker: I finally finished all of my work.

•        Listener:  Oh good, now you can help clean up.

•        Active Listener:  You must feel relieved, that was a lot of work.

See how much easier that is to hear?

 

The ‘Praise Sandwich’


Try giving a ‘praise sandwich’. Effective feedback is fact-based observation of what is going well – and describes changes in the future as “next steps” rather than criticism. It ends with praise or encouragement. Here’s an example of effective feedback as a “Praise Sandwich”:

•        “Nice job!”(speaking right at eye level with Jacey)

•        “Next time, you might think about using a softer voice.

•        “I really liked how you gave her a high five at the end.

See how you slip the meat into the middle of the sandwich? It works every time!

Stress Management Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation, an Innovation and Improvement Project funded by the Office of Head Start/ACF, DHHS, Grant  #90YD0268 “Taking Care of Ourselves”. https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov

About Nashville TMS:
In April of 2010, Dr. Scott West brought the technology of NeuroStar TMS to Nashville, becoming the first physician in Tennessee to offer the option of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for patients whose severe Major Depressive Disorder has not responded to multiple courses of antidepressant medications and/or other depression treatments. Dr. West and the Nashville TMS Team has successfully treated over 500 patients from Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, California, Missouri, New York, Florida, and Alabama. Hear what Nashville TMS patients have to say about their depression treatment experiences and outcomes!

Written by: Lisa Chapman

Stigma of Mental Illness is Rampant

Media Stigma of Mental Illness is Rampant

Declare Yourself ‘Stigma-Free’!


Stigma related to mental illness is a national health problem,” says Melissa Pinto, PhD, RN, an instructor in the School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University who studies stigma related to mental health. “Young people hear messages about mental health disorders from an early age — as a result, many of them are scared to be around people with mental illness.

On television and in films, characters with a mental disorder often play the villain,” according to Pinto “In order to eliminate mental illness stigma, these media portrayals need to become more accurate.”

 

Films and Mental Health


This media treatment of mental health is largely responsible for our ingrained biases about mental illness. These films are just a couple of examples:

Mel Brooks created the parody High Anxiety, a spoof of suspense films about mental illness.

Mel Brooks in
'High Anxiety'

If you struggle with anxiety or anxiety disorders, you know that they’re serious business. But Mel Brooks created the parody High Anxiety, a spoof of suspense films about mental illness. The main character arrives at his administrator job at the Psycho-Neurotic Institute for the Very, Very Nervous and finds strange happenings. In order to prove himself innocent of murder, he must confront his own “high anxiety”.

Starring Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt, Academy Award winning film As Good as It Gets deals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

'As Good As It Gets'
for Jack Nicholson

Starring Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt, Academy Award winning film As Good as It Gets deals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Nicholson’s character Melvin suffers from OCD - an anxiety disorder - with symptoms that include recurring thoughts and repetitive behaviors. But Melvin begins to overcome his anxiety through a series of events which include taking care of and eventually liking a neighbor’s dog, and going on a road trip with the neighbor & a waitress love interest.

 

Bizarre Mental Health Situations


Wacky film examples of mental health stigmatization in the media:

• Troubled Bette Davis in 'Now, Voyager'
• 'What About Bob?' and Bill Murray
• Hitchcock’s 'Vertigo' - includes Acrophobia (or fear of heights) and a suicide attempt
• 'Airplane!' and the Fear of Flying about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
• Anxiety-Riddled 'Greenberg' with Ben Stiller
• 'The Aviator': The Story of Famous Recluse Howard Hughes


It’s not just films and the media. Our society as a whole is ingrained with prejudice toward mental illness. Sufferers are often widely perceived to be dangerous or unpredictable. Reinforcement of these popular myths through the media can perpetuate the stigma surrounding mental illness, precipitating shame, self-blame, and secrecy, all of which discourage affected individuals from seeking treatment.

Now it’s time to recognize and acknowledge this, so we can reframe our thinking and help end the stigma associated with mental illness.

 

How You Can Be Stigma-Free


National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) created a powerful campaign to help stop the Stigma – one person and one step at a time:

Step 1:
Educate Yourself and Others
Many people know at least a little about mental health issues, but it’s important to know the facts about mental illness. You can help educate others and reject stigmatizing stereotypes. Mental illness is not the result of personal weakness, lack of character or poor upbringing. Understanding mental health isn't only about being able to identify symptoms and having a name for these conditions. It’s also about dispelling many false ideas about mental health patients and conditions.

Step 2:
See the Person and Not the Illness
One in 5 Americans live with a mental health condition and each of them has their own story. Their paths and journeys say more about them than their diagnoses. If you are close to someone with a mental health condition, get to know them as a person and treat them with kindness and empathy. That means far more than just knowing what they are going through.

Step 3:
Take Action on Mental Health Issues
The US mental health care system has been in crisis for far too long. It often keeps treatment and recovery out of the hands of many individuals who need it most. We can take action now as we push for better legislation and policies to improve lives for everyone. By lending your support you can show that this cause is important to you and desperately needed for millions of Americans.

Join others in NAMI’s I am Stigma-Free” campaign:

 

The Stigma-Free Pledge


Individuals, companies, organizations and others can all take the pledge to learn more about mental illness. Learn to see a person for who they are. Take action on mental health issues.

So take the stigma-free pledge and help raise awareness!

 

Finding Treatment for Mental Illness


Getting a diagnosis is just the first step; knowing your own preferences and goals is also important. Treatments for mental illness vary by diagnosis and by person. There’s no “one size fits all” treatment. Treatment options can include medication, counseling (therapy), social support and education.

TMS Therapy is increasingly recognized by the medical community and payers such as Medicaid and insurance companies as the best treatment for depression. After a thorough evaluation and intake process, NeuroStar TMS Therapy is prescribed by a psychiatrist and delivered in an outpatient setting.

TMS technology is similar to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The NeuroStar TMS Therapy® System uses highly focused magnetic pulses to stimulate the Prefrontal Cortex – to restore it to normal function and lift your depression.

  • NeuroStar TMS Therapy has been proven safe and effective in the treatment of depression, as documented in clinical studies as well as a long history of patient experiences.

  • Because it does not use depressing drugs, NeuroStar TMS Therapy is free of side effects typically experienced with antidepressant medications.


About Nashville TMS:

In April of 2010, Dr. Scott West brought the technology of NeuroStar TMS to Nashville, becoming the first physician in Tennessee to offer the option of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for patients whose severe Major Depressive Disorder has not responded to multiple courses of antidepressant medications and/or other depression treatments. Dr. West and the Nashville TMS Team has successfully treated over 500 patients from Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, California, Missouri, New York, Florida, and Alabama. Hear what Nashville TMS patients have to say about their depression treatment experiences and outcomes!

Written by: Lisa Chapman

Image Credit: A mentally ill patient in a strait-jacket attached to the wall and a strange barrel shaped contraption around his legs.
Photograph after a wood engraving by E. Tritschler, 1908. 1908 after: Emil TritsclerPublished:
Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images images@wellcome.ac.uk http://wellcomeimages.org

Inspirational Mental Health Quotes for 2016

Celebrate your Individuality in 2016 Happy New Year from Nashville TMS!

As we each continue our journey through 2016, the Team of caregivers and support staff at Nashville TMS wish you a Happy New Year.  We respect and admire each individual for the unique and valuable gifts they offer. Let’s all celebrate Individuality in 2016!

We hope that in this collection of inspirational quotes, you will find something that appeals to you, something you will take with you, and perhaps share with others.

 

Inspirational Mental Health Quotes


Your present circumstances don’t determine where you can go; they merely determine where you start. –Nido Qubein

Forgive others, not only because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace. – Bipolar Bandit

We cannot be more sensitive to pleasure without being more sensitive to pain – Alan Watts

What we achieve inwardly will change outer reality. –Plutarch

I think you have to try and fail because failure gets you closer to what you’re good at –Louis C. K.

I can’t change the direction of the wind but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination –Jimmy Dean

Stop hating yourself for everything you aren’t and start loving yourself for everything you are. – Bipolar Bandit

A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity. An optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. –Winston Churchill

All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better. -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Respect yourself enough to walk away from anything that no longer serves you, grows you, or makes you happy. –Bipolar Bandit

Clouds come floating into my life no longer to carry ruin or usher storm but to add color to my sunset sky. –Rabindranath Tragore

Here is the test to find whether your life on earth is finished: if you’re alive it isn’t. –Richard Bach

Out of suffering have merged the strongest souls: the most massive characters are seared with scars. -Khalil Gibran

It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. –Aristotle Onassis

The best way out is always through. –Robert Frost

The strongest people are not those who show strength in front of us, but those who win battles we know nothing about. – Bipolar Bandit

Spending today complaining about yesterday won’t improve tomorrow. –Unidentified

About Nashville TMS:


In April of 2010, Dr. Scott West brought the technology of NeuroStar TMS to Nashville, becoming the first physician in Tennessee to offer the option of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for patients whose severe Major Depressive Disorder has not responded to multiple courses of antidepressant medications and/or other depression treatments. Dr. West and the Nashville TMS Team has successfully treated over 500 patients from Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, California, Missouri, New York, Florida, and Alabama. Hear what Nashville TMS patients have to say about their depression treatment experiences and outcomes!

Written by: Lisa Chapman
Know someone who suffers?

‘Normal’ Depression vs ‘Clinical’ Depression.
What’s the difference?
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Patients Talk About TMS

What is Depression?


Video 4:28

About Scott West, MD

Dr. Scott West has dedicated his professional career to helping people overcome clinical depression. He has practiced psychiatry in Nashville Tennessee since 1986, when he finished his residency in psychiatry at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Prior to that, he graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and received his medical degree from the University of Tennessee Medical Center in Memphis. He is a Diplomate of The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in the specialty of Psychiatry and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

More about Scott West, MD